2016: A Year of Books

It’s that time again; we’re saying goodbye to the old year and hello to the new. There has been a lot about 2016 which has been unpleasant, worrying, and sad, and I’m making an effort to remember that it hasn’t all been bad by any stretch. We’ve had some wonderful adventures and happy news throughout the year and I have been blessed, as I am every year, with opportunities and love. It’s also been a brilliant year for reading! (So it definitely can’t have been that bad.😉) At the beginning of the year I set myself a challenge to read 100 books, and I managed it (just)! I’ve actually just finished my 101st book of 2016 so I even managed to beat my goal. I thought I’d share with you my reading year and recommend some of my favourites. Here’s a round up of my year in books (be warned, it’s lengthy!)…


I started the year with some brilliant books: I devoured Illuminae and read the whole thing cover to cover on New Year’s Day. It’s definitely one of the most original books I’ve read in terms of execution of an idea and I found it compelling to read a story told in such an unique way. 

I also read, and adored, Patrick Rothfuss’ The Slow Regard of Silent Things. I so enjoyed heading back to this world (Rothfuss is a genius of the genre) and I found this tale told from Auri’s perspective to be haunting and moving. It’s not an continuation of the Kingkiller Chronicles and I know many were disappointed because of this, but I found it utterly enchanting and a true testament to Rothfuss’ skill and imagination. 

Another favourite was Uprooted, a truly engrossing fantasy. I loved how unusual the magic was in this story and loved the characters and how they developed throughout. I’ve lent this to many people, all of whom have loved it. (It’s also one of the most beautiful books on my shelves!)

I enjoyed revisiting an old favourite series  in The Black Magician trilogy – The High Lord is one of my favourite characters. 

Bird by Bird was one of my favourite reads of the year. It really made me want to write more of my own and made me feel like it wouldn’t matter if it turned out to be utter tripe, as long as I had the courage to actually write it! I haven’t done as much writing as I had hoped but thei book certainly spurred me on to write more than I’ve ever managed before.

My mum lent me a copy of The Phantom Tollbooth and I thouroughly enjoyed it. A fantastical world filled with entertaining word play. A great fun read!

A couple of highly recommended books on bookstagram that made my reading list this year were Queen of Shadows and Shatter Me. I really enjoyed Queen of Shadows, in fact I loved the whole series – Caleana is a great character! Unfortunately, I did not feel so positive about Shatter Me. I can’t quite put my finger on it but it just didn’t grab me. I normally enjoy reading YA but this one just felt too young, somehow. I know many people loved it though and it’s an interesting premise so I’d still give it a go.

I enjoyed The Martian immensely and it’s one of the few books that I have read AFTER I’ve seen the film. It’s funny and somehow still profound: I just love Watney’s dry humour. I’d also highly recommend the film as a really try interpretation of the book – Matt Damon is excellent!

The Catcher In The Rye is on that I have been meaning to read for an absolute age and the couple of times I started it I just wasn’t in the right mood. Not the case this time! I always think it’s worth persevering with classics if they don’t quite grab you the first time, as I have found with many that when I eventually get my brain to engage then I really enjoy them.

Ah, so many good ones in this little batch! The Long Way To A Small Angry Planet is a compelling and original story which Infound incredibly thoroughly gut provoking. It’s sci-for as I’ve never read it before and I completely fell in love with the crew of the Wayfarer. I’m excited to read the sequel in 2017!

I finally got around to reading a couple of children’s classics which I had never read before: Peter Pan and A Little Princess. Both were wonderful! Peter Pan is wonderfully weird and fantastical but the classic story which many of us grew up with (regardless of whether you’d read the book or not) doesn’t fail to engross, even as an adult reader. A Little Princess is completely enchanting and has some of the most beautiful lines and turns of phrase in it. I grew up loving the film adaptation of this book, my favourite part of which was always the magical transformation of the attic – it was just as magical, if not more so, in the book! Loved it!

I also have to mention Girl of Ink and Stars – this book is utterly wonderful. You cannot help but fall in love with the characters and the island, and the storyline strikes the perfect balance between being vividly real and disturbingly fantastical.

Two more favourites from this year were Rebel Of The Sands and The Reader On The 6:27. Rebel Of The Sands is magical and bursting with imagination. It’s so brilliantly written that everything leaps out at you – you can almost feel the heat rippling off the page and constantly expect to find grains of sand trickling into your lap. Read it.

I continued my re-reading of Harry Potter over the summer which is always a favourite of mine. If you’ve not yet read this series then you should give it a go.

Queen of The Tearling was a great new fantasy read and, again, I’m excited to read the next in the series in 2017. 

The Red Notebook is a really lovely story – great for fans of The Storied Life of AJ Fikry!

I am not normally one for non-fiction or biographies but I had to give I am Malala a chance and I was not disappointed. I already knew something of Malala’s story but reading it in her own words was truly moving and made me feel proudly fortunate. I was also so struck by what an incredible man her father is – we need more men like him in the world.

I was excited to receive The Graces in my Illumicrate box in July and really enjoyed reading it. I felt it took a little while to get going but was one of those I couldn’t quite put down.

Sleeping Giants was initially a cover but (so pretty!) but I was really pleased to have picked it up. It has echos of Illumicrate but is adult sci-if rather than YA. I also enjoyed reading a sci-fi that was set entirely on Earth!

I had so much fun reading all the new wizard of world books released by Pottermore this year – I loved reading a bit more about some of my favourite characters, particularly McGonagall. If you’re a HP fan and haven’t read these yet then you should go and read them. They’re inexpensive, quick to read, and a delightful trip back to the wizard of world.

Other favourites from this bunch were Ted Hughes’ poetry collection, Crow, and the recently published Grief Is The Thing With Feathers, which it inspired. Both were dark, profound and deeply moving. Anyone who has grieved will find something of truth in these pages and it is strangely comforting.

Pax is one of my absolute favourites from this year. A thoroughly moving story about a boy and his best friend, who happens to be a fox. It’s a lovely tale but the thing that struck me much was how TRUE the pages from Pax’s perspective felt. That might sound strange, after all how on earth would I know what a fox’s perspective would sound like, and yet it felt completely right. It wa the perfect autumn read.

My Grandmother Sends Her Regards and Apologises joins Pax on my absolute favourites of 2016 list. This book was charming, magical, relatable, and laugh-out-loud funny. I have bought at least 3 copies to give to other people and cannot recommend it highly enough.

Probably the most controversial book I’ve read this year is Harry Potter and The Cursed Child. I have seen such mixed reviews about it: some love it, some hate it, some have gone so far as to say they feel betrayed by JK for putting her name to it(?!). As far as I’m concerned it was great fun! It was NOT the 8th Harry Potter book but I never expected it to be. It was fun to return to Hogwarts; it was fun to imagine the possible futures of my favourite characters; it was fun to see something of the next generation of witches and wizards. Yes, there were some slightly questionable plot points, yes, it did read a little like fan fiction – but, honestly, I still loved it. I would happily read it again and I really, really hope I get to see the play at some point.

My last big batch of reading from 2016 included some of my Christmas favourites: A Christmas Carol is to this day the only Dicken’s book I have read all the way through. I hope to change this in 2017 as I really do love this book and although Dicken’s writing is incredibly wordy I think it is beautiful.

Chasers of the Light was a Christmas present and I absolutely loved it. Simple, but stunning, poetry typed on found paper – a joy to read.


My 100th book of the year was The Snow Child which has been on my bedside table for 2 years waiting to be read. This tale is achingly sad but beautifully written. It is a haunting tale and Ivey perfectly evokes the ethereality of deep winter and human desire for connection and love.

As well as reading my 100 books, I’ve also had another great fun year on bookstagram! Here are my #bestnine from 2016…


There’s clearly a favoured theme since I haven’t stuck to one theme all year but these all got the most likes. I haven’t decided what I might do with bookstagram in 2017 (to stick with one theme or keep a messy feed, that is the question…) but I do know that I still love this online bookish community. The pictures are beautiful and inspiring and the people are kind and encouraging. It’s a great little creative outlet and I look forward to another bookish year being a par of it.

So there you have it, my year in books! I hope you had a wonderful year, whether it was bookish or not. Please leave any of your own recommendations/favourite reads of 2016 in the comments.

Whatever your 2016 was like I wish you all the happiest of New Years, and love, peace, and joy for 2017.

Armchair Travels


Mega, mega excited for the deliver of the first ever Fernweh Fiction box! It’s been a tough few days and this has brightened up my week no end. I’ve only had chance to have a quick look through the contents but I’m already impressed: the book is one I’ve never come across and looks brilliant, the additional gifts (of which there are many!) are thoughtfully selected and each beautiful, functional, fun, or delicious in their own right. 

If you want to see what’s inside check out my Instagram story for a full unboxing, but if you’re still waiting for your box then avoid the spoilers because unwrapping the contents was so much fun!

I’m super impressed with The Travelling Reader’s first book box and can’t wait to nestle down with the book. If you’re not already subscribed then sign up quick at fernwehfiction.co.uk.

Watch this space for more photos of what’s inside!

Wisdom for the Week

Image found here via Pinterest.

Now coming to the end of a busy second week of the new school year, this quote seems very apt! After the luxury of a long holiday it can feel like a bit of a shock to the system when the working days and weeks are flying by and it seems I barely have time to eat and sleep, let alone anything else. But reading is important. Reading teaches us things and reminds us of things we know but might have forgotten. Reading takes us out of ourselves and helps us reflect on ourselves. Reading is an adventure and a quiet space to rest in. So we must make time to read, no matter how busy life gets.

How I Fell in Love with Reading

  
Last week I shared the questions we had been asking students at school, to celebrate world book day. I promised you my answers so here they are:

1) What is your first memory of reading?

Honestly, reading has been part of my life since before I can remember. So much so that there isn’t a specific memory that sticks out because reading just was. I have many memories, all blurred together, of reading with my mum, my dad, and my gran, in particular. Bedtime stories were the norm. Morning stories were the norm. Mid-afternoon stories were the norm! 

I remember Mum reading Tubby and Tootsie to me and my brother in the car when were parked up somewhere, early in the morning. Mumhated that book but she still read it with all the enthusiasm necessary to make telling a story an enchanting experience…which is why I asked for it again and again!

I remember sitting with all my cousins, cosied up in the duvet on the big double bed in the spare room at my gran and grandpa’s house, eating toast squares and listening intently as Granny read aloud from The Children of Cherry Tree Farm for the umpteenth time. We all used to imagine what it would be like to have a squirrel for a pet or to meet a wild-man named Tamylan living in the woods nearby. 

I remember Dad reading bedtime stories as he tucked me in for the night. I couldn’t tell you what story, but I can tell you how safe and loved I felt in those moments. Strong hands tucking my duvet in. Deep soothing voice intoning whatever my chosen story was, or speaking of clouds to lull me to sleep.

I have so many precious memories around reading but it wasn’t just the books and the stories I loved, it was the experience of reading with people I loved that made it so special.
2) What is your favourite story?

I don’t think I could answer this question if I tried! I have so many. But I suppose what I love is the story where good wins; where things aren’t perfect but people are happy anyway; where truth is discovered; where corruption is challenged; where evil is overcome; where love is found; where different worlds and times and cultures come alive and dance off the page. My favourite story is the one I can get completely lost in.

3) What book(s) have you read that you think I should read?

This could be a very long list… I’ll give you a few but this is by no means an exhaustive list!!

The Perks of Being a Wallflower

Harry Potter

His Dark Materials

Jane Eyre

Winnie the Pooh

The Night Circus

Mist Over Pendle

Bird by Bird

To Kill A Mocking Bird

I Capture The Castle

…I’m going to stop now or we’ll be here forever.

4) What book, story or character has changed your life?

(Why did we make these questions so hard?! They’re killing me!!)

Again, I could list so many and for so many different reasons. I’m going to try and restrain myself and just mention 2. Firstly, The Perks of Being a Wallflower was a really important story for me because its ideas of difference, identity, and mental health just hit home. Although my personal experiences were nothing like Charlie’s, I could still empathise so much with his character. His story spoke to me. Secondly, Mist Over Pendle as this was the first book that I remember being really enchanted with the language and the crafting of words. I think this is where my appreciation for beautiful writing, not just stories, began.

5) Is there a place you would like to visit, or a journey you would like to go on, based on a book you have read?

Lots probably, but the one that springs to mind is Prague, which I have wanted to visit since reading Daughter of Smoke and Bone. It just sounds like the most amazing place and I’m dying to see the astronomical clock!

6) How did you fall in love with reading?

I guess my answer to question 1 answers this one too! I fell in love with reading through the love of stories and books my parents and grandparents shared with me. Through the experience of togetherness I had when being read to or read with, I came to love stories for just that: an experience. Through the wide range of stories told to me, and books I was introduced to as a child, I came to love them for the words and the worlds they contained. I continue to fall in love with reading everytime I pick up a book; the look and the feel of the book itself, the smell of the pages, and the enchantment, wisdom, and illusion that unfolds from the letters printed within. (Who knew you could create such beauty from black squiggles on a page?) 

How else can you travel the world and beyond, or see into the minds of great thinkers of the past without leaving the comfort of your home…or even your bed?! Books and stories are such an incredible gift and I thank all the people who have brought, are bringing, and will bring these things into the world. You are truly magicians. 

I’d love to know your own responses to any or all of these questions. Please feel free to share in the comments below!

Happy reading. 😊

 

World Book Day

   
 
Today was World Book Day, aka the best day in the year! Our theme at school was Nostalgia: how I fell in love with reading. It was so much fun spending the day as Sophie from the BFG, working alongside Matilda, Tintin, the Very Hungry Caterpillar and Fern from Charlotte’s Web. (Yes, I do in fact have the most awesome colleagues ever!)

To go alongside our fabulous interpretations of our favourite characters, we spent the day asking staff and students about their reading experiences, and now I’m going to ask you the same questions!

1) What is your first memory of reading?

2) What is your favourite story?

3) What book(s) have you read that you think I should read?

4) What book, story or character has changed your life?

5) Is there a place you would like to visit, or a journey you would like to go on, based on a book you have read?

And finally:

6) How did you fall in love with reading?

I’d love to hear your answers. I’ll be sharing mine tomorrow so be sure to pop back! 

Happy reading everyone. 😊

Would You Rather: Book Edition

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I came across this bookish version of ‘Would You Rather’ on mylittlebookobsession’s instagram/blog feed (which you should obsolutely check out, by the way) and couldn’t resist joining in the fun!

So, would you rather…

Read only trilogies or standalones?

Although this is tricky because there are so many amazing stand alone books, I would have to say trilogies. I love series of books because when discovering a good book and then finding out it’s the first in a series is the best thing!

Read only female or male authors?

First of all, I hate this question. The author’s gender is irrelevant to me to be honest; it’s their writing that is important not whether they are male or female.

That said, if I absolutely HAD to choose, the feminist in me would say female authors because male authors still dominate the book world, particularly in my favourite genre (fantasy), and that is a shame because I have no doubt there are some amazing female authors that the world is missing out on.

Still. Hate that question.

Shop at bookstore or online?

Although I love the convenience of shopping online I would choose bookstores. There’s nothing like browsing in a bookstore and coming away with a brand new book…or two…or three… I can’t imagine not being able to enjoy that.

All books become movies or tv shows?

I love TV shows but I always miss them when they’re on and end up binge watching them, which, whilst fun, renders me completely unproductive! I can’t imagine how unproductive that would make me if ALL books became TV shows! With that in mind, I think I’d have to go with movies.

Read 5 pages per day or 5 books per week?

Who only reads 5 pages a day?? HOW DO YOU COPE?! 5 books per week. Definitely…although I may get less done at work.

Be a professional reviewer or author?

Hands down, an author. I often struggle to find anything to say about the books I read other than IT WAS SO GOOD GO READ IT NOW, so I’m not sure I’m cut out to be a reviewer. Being an author on the other hand is actually my secret dream…

Only read your top 20 favorite books over and over again or always read new books that you haven’t read before?

The pain of answering this question is real and brutal. It actually breaks my heart a little to imagine either of these scenarios being real. I cannot imagine not being able to re-read my favourites over and over again…but equally, never being able to read a new book would be devastating. I think I would have to go with…only reading new books. *cries at the thought* Urgh, it hurts!! Has to be that one though; I already get upset at the thought that I won’t ever be able to read all the books I want to because there are more every flipping day!

Be a librarian or bookseller?

A bookseller!! In a quirky little independent bookstore with big squishy chairs!

Only read your favorite genre or read every genre except your favorite genre?

Only read my favourite genre. I don’t know how I’d deal with not having the complete escapism of fantasy.

Only read physical books or ebooks?

I love my kindle. I love the convenience, I love that I can carry literally THOUSANDS of books in my handbag and switch what I’m reading without moving. I love that the books are often cheaper. I love that you can buy a book from your bed in the middle of the night when you can’t seep and start reading it immediately…but…it’s not the same as a real book. So it’s got to be only physical books. (Also, what would I take pictures of if I only had my kindle!! Haha!

 

So there you have it! What would YOU rather??

Another Year Read

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Happy New Year lovely people! It’s hard to believe another year is over – 2015 seems to have disappeared in the blink of an eye! I did an awful lot of reading in those 12 months (and took a lot of pictures of books!) so I thought I’d do a year in books round up – here is a list of everything I read in 2015:

1. Unwind – Neal Shusterman

2. The Rithmatist – Brandon Sanderson

3. Private Peaceful – Michael Morpurgo (read for work)

4. The Strange Library – Haruki Murakami

5. The Library of Unrequited Love – Sophie Divry

6. Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck (re-read for work)

7. Romeo & Juliet – Shakespeare (re-read for work)

8. Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte (re-read for work)

9. Abomination – Robert Swindells

10. Eleanor & Park – Rainbow Rowell

11. Only Ever Yours – Louise O’Neill

12. The Golem & The Djinni – Helene Wecker

13. Not That Kind Of Girl – Lena Dunham

14. The Innocent Mage – Karen Miller

15. Thief of Time – Terry Pratchett

16. The Infographic Guide to Literature – Joanna Eliot

17. The Rosie Project – Graeme Simsion

18. The Invisible Library – Genevieve Cogman

19. Steelheart – Brandon Sanderson

20.  Dante and Aristotle Discover the Secrets of the Universe –  Benjamin Alire Sáenz

21. The Coincidence Authority – John Ironmonger

22. The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry – Rachel Joyce

23. The Sleeper and the Spindle – Neil Gaiman

24. The Looking Glass Wars  – Frank Beddor

25. All the Bright Places – Jennifer Niven

26.  The Innocent Mage – Karen Miller

27. The Awakened Mage – Karen Miller

28.Not That Kind of Girl – Lena Dunham

29. Earth, Air, Fire and Custard – Tom Holt

30. The Chrysalids – John Wyndham

31. The Soul Trade – E.E. Richardson

32. The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry – Gabrielle Zevin

33. All That is Solid Melts Into Air – Darragh McKeon

34. The Little Prince – Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

35. The Witches – Roald Dahl

36. The Glass Books of The Dream Eaters – Gordon Dahlquist

37. The Knife of Never Letting Go – Patrick Ness

38. Where The Sidewalk Ends – Shel Silversten

39. The Tempest – William Shakespeare

40. DNA – Dennis Kelly

41. Ella Minnow Pea – Mark Dunn

42. Very Good Lives – J.K. Rowling

43. How to Build a Girl – Caitlin Moran

44. The Wise Man’s Fear – Patrick Rothfuss

45. A Mislaid Magic – Joyce Windsor

46. Seraphina – Rachel Hartman

47. Smilers Fair – Rebecca Levene

48. The Colour of Magic – Terry Pratchett

49. Not That Kind of Girl – Lena Dunham

50. Eunoia – Christian Bock

51. A Christmas Carol – Charles Dickens

52. Night of Cake and Puppets – Lani Taylor

53. The Paper Magician – Charlie N Holmberg

54. The Heart of Darkness – Joseph Conrad

55. Eros Unbound – Anais Nin

56. Will Grayson, Will Grayson – David Levithian & John Green

57.The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavander – Leslye Walton

58. Rules of the Red Rubber Ball – Kevin Carroll

59. Tales of Beedle The Bard – J K Rowling

60. Giver – Lois Lowry

61. Sun and Moon – Lindsey Yankee

62. Mental Morfosis – Franz De Paula

63. Throne of Glass – Sarah J Maas

64. Tiny Book of Tiny Stories – Joseph Gordon-Levitt

65. Tiny Book of Tiny Stories 2 – Joseph Gordon-Levitt

66. Tiny Book of Tiny Stories 3 – Joseph Gordon-Levitt

67. Crown of Midnight – Sarah J Maas

68. Night Owls – Jenn Bennett

69. Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone – J K Rowling

70. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets – J K Rowling

71. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban – J K Rowling

72. The Rest of Us Just Live Here – Partick Ness

73. Fever Crumb – Phillip Reeve

74. Heir  of Fire – Sarah J Maas

75. The Fox and The Star – Coralie Bickford-Smith

76. The Uncommon Reader – Alan Bennett

77. Magonia – Maria Dahvana Headley

78. Shadow and Bone – Leigh Bardugo

79. An Ember in The Ashes – Sabaa Tabhir

80. Poisoned Apples – Christine Heppermann

 

I could honestly recommend any one of these books but my favourites were: Dante and Aristotle Discover the Secrets of the Universe, The Wise Man’s Fear, Shadow and Bone, An Ember in the Ashes, Harry Potter (all of them!), The Uncommon Reader, The Throne of Glass series, Very Good Lives, Magonia, The Storied Life of AJ Fikry and Ella Minnow Pea.

Hoping you had a wonderful Christmas and New Year and wishing you a fabulous 2016!

What I’ve Been Reading

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I shared, back at the beginning of April, all the lovely books that I had read so far in 2015. I thought it was time for an update. 🙂

I seem to be going through phases at the moment; one week I’ll be reading up a storm and get through 2 or 3 books, the next I won’t even get halfway through one. Whichever state I’ve been in I have still managed to devour a good number of books, all of which I have enjoyed. So here’s the list of my reads from April-July 2015 (in no particular order):

1) The Rosie Project – Graeme Simsion

2) The Invisible Library – Genevieve Cogman

3) Steelheart – Brandon Sanderson

4) Dante and Aristotle Discover the Secrets of the Universe –  Benjamin Alire Sáenz

5) The Coincidence Authority – John Ironmonger

6) The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry – Rachel Joyce

7) The Sleeper and the Spindle – Neil Gaiman

8) The Looking Glass Wars  – Frank Beddor

9) All the Bright Places – Jennifer Niven

10) The Innocent Mage – Karen Miller

11) The Awakened Mage – Karen Miller

12) Not That Kind of Girl – Lena Dunham

13) Earth, Air, Fire and Custard – Tom Holt

14) The Chrysalids – John Wyndham

15) The Soul Trade – E.E. Richardson

16) The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry – Gabrielle Zevin

17) All That is Solid Melts Into Air – Darragh McKeon

18) The Little Prince – Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

19) The Witches – Roald Dahl

20) The Glass Books of The Dream Eaters – Gordon Dahlquist

21) The Knife of Never Letting Go – Patrick Ness

22) Where The Sidewalk Ends – Shel Silversten

23) The Tempest – William Shakespeare

24) DNA – Dennis Kelly

25) Ella Minnow Pea – Mark Dunn

26) Very Good Lives – J.K. Rowling

27)How to Build a Girl – Caitlin Moran

I really did enjoy every single one of these books, however my absolute favourites were The Knife of Never Letting Go, Ella Minnow Pea, Where The Sidewalk Ends, Very Good Lives and Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe.

The Knife of Never Letting Go and Aristotle and Dante both moved me to tears (for completely different reasons) and are both beautifully written books with fantastic characters. Very Good Lives was a super quick read and is full of pearls of wisdom; a real manifesto for first world living in the 21st Century. Where The Sidewalk Ends is just a wonderful collection of Shel Silverston’s poetry and made me smile so much. Ella Minnow Pea is, quite frankly, a work of genius. As well as being a great story it is just incredibly clever.

So there you have it. My reading update for 2015 taking me nicely to 43 books read so far this year. I’m slightly behind the 50 mark I was hoping to have hit but I’ve got a few weeks of summer left to catch myself up and a couple of long haul flights in October should help as well! 🙂

What have you been reading lately?

What I’ve Been Reading

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I started the year with about 45 books on my ‘to be read’ list. Well…ok that was the shortened list. Let’s call it my ‘to be read first’ list! I’ve read 16 since the new year; although they didn’t all start on the list, some of them ended up being added by accident…along with another 20 or so.

So, I thought I’d share what I’ve been reading in the first 3 months of 2015.

1. Unwind – Neal Shusterman

2. The Rithmatist – Brandon Sanderson

3. Private Peaceful – Michael Morpurgo (read for work)

4. The Strange Library – Haruki Murakami

5. The Library of Unrequited Love – Sophie Divry

6. Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck (re-read for work)

7. Romeo & Juliet – Shakespeare (re-read for work)

8. Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte (re-read for work)

9. Abomination – Robert Swindells

10. Eleanor & Park – Rainbow Rowell

11. Only Ever Yours – Louise O’Neill

12. The Golem & The Djinni – Helene Wecker

13. Not That Kind Of Girl – Lena Dunham

14. The Innocent Mage – Karen Miller

15. Thief of Time – Terry Pratchett

16. The Infographic Guide to Literature – Joanna Eliot

I’d quite happily recommend any of these books but my favourites were Unwind, The Rithmatist, The Strange Library, Eleanor & Park and The Innocent Mage.  If you’re looking for your next read you should definitely consider giving one (or all) of these a go!

What have you bee reading?